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World Cup 2018: day 10 buildup with Belgium and Germany in action – live!

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6.50am BST

How about some England analysis? Although they don’t play their second match until tomorrow there’s plenty of talking points coming out of Gareth Southgate’s camp. Not least the starting XI for the clash with Panama.

“We obviously have competition for places, strength in depth, players that came off the bench and had an impact on the game the other day,” Southgate said. “I have to balance all those things out when I make a decision on the team. But to play with the freedom, the energy and the pace that we did [against Tunisia] was as good as anything I have seen in the tournament up to this point. The team performed as well as I can remember us playing with the ball in the first hour of the game. I don’t see us making too many changes to what we did.”

Related: Gareth Southgate to confirm Panama line-up to England players on Saturday

6.44am BST

The Museum of the Russian Academy of Arts in Saint Petersburg is hosting an art project by the Italian artist Fabrizio Birimbelli entitled Like the Gods. The project presents a series of more than 40 portraits of world football stars and coaches in historical uniforms.

This is fun. My personal highlight is George Best in the background of Paul Pogba’s portrait.

Related: Like the Gods: footballers as historic paintings – in pictures

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Holiday guide to inland Galicia, Spain: vineyards, hotels and restaurants

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One of Spain’s most mysterious regions, Ribeira Sacra is home to spectacular gorges and rivers, ancient monasteries and some of the country’s best wine
Walking Spain’s most spectacular coast

Straddling the provinces of Lugo and Ourense in the middle of Galicia sits La Ribeira Sacra, one of Spain’s least known and most mysterious areas. Its rivers, Miño and Sil, which meet at the region’s heart, mould the landscape, gouging out vast canyons and vertiginous valleys. Thick green forests frame these rivers and hide medieval monasteries, whose presence gives the area a sort of hushed spirituality.

And then there’s the wine, the area’s most famous export. The valley slopes are lined with centuries-old terraced grapevines. To visit the Ribeira Sacra is to visit a different Spain, a quieter, greener country, and a world away from its crowded Mediterranean beaches too.

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Unsung Heroines: Danielle de Niese on Female Composers review – listen up!

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The soprano fills in the missing history of western classical music, and treats the viewer to some spine-tingling renditions of Hildegard of Bingen and Francesca Caccini

I think I know this one, the story of the great composers of western classical music. Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Wagner, etc. Sure enough, we begin with the reassuring, macho intro of Beethoven’s Fifth: da-da-da-DUM.

But that’s enough of him, fade out Beethoven. The soprano Danielle de Niese isn’t telling that story; she is telling another, parallel one, about women who compose music. Not just sing and play and inspire music by and for men, but actually write the stuff. Women always have composed and will do forever, it’s just that you don’t get to hear very much of it. Literally unsung, see?

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Beyoncé Is Our Michael Jackson: All Hail the Queen of Pop

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Photo by Lyne Lucien/The Daily Beast

It feels so good to be proven right. Wait, I’m getting ahead of myself. Let me start at the beginning.

The year was 2009. Michael Jackson had died days earlier and the BET Awards became a tribute to him, with Jamie Foxx, Ne-Yo, Ciara and more performing his songs and doing his moves and praising his greatness. It was a legendary night on Black Twitter. That night I saw one of the funniest tweets I’ve ever seen. BET was celebrating MJ in its way which, as usual, sometimes made us proud that there was a network dedicated to Black culture and sometimes made us exasperated that BET was that network. And in the midst of the madness someone, I don’t know who, tweeted this: “I wish BET died and Michael Jackson did a tribute to them.” Oh man, Black Twitter was crackling that night. And then finally the epic group conversation turned to the inevitable question: Who is the next MJ? Or really, Who’s the King of Pop now?

A few names were floated, no serious contenders. Then Questlove, dream hampton, and I fell into our own sub-conversation where we quickly realized that the answer was clear: the King of Pop was dead and the heir to the throne was… Beyoncé. Reader, believe me when I tell you, after the three of us asserted that we got killed. I felt like I was drowning in hate tweets. But I knew we were right.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

I lost both my sons to drugs – that's why I want to legalise them

News Round-up -

Ray Lakeman’s sons died after taking ecstasy, but he says that had the drugs been legal and regulated, it might have saved them

When two young adults died after taking ecstasy at the Mutiny music festival last month, Ray Lakeman understood the bereaved parents’ nightmare better than most. In 2014, his two sons had been exactly the same age – 18 and 20 – when they travelled together to Manchester for a football match. The younger boy, a physics and astronomy undergraduate, had bought ecstasy on the dark web, which he and his brother took after the game. Police officers knocked on the Lakemans’ door two days later, to tell them their boys had been found dead in their hotel room.

“So I understand,” he says softly, “what those parents are going through. I can understand they’ll be absolutely furious.” The public appeal by one bereaved mother (“If nothing else I hope what happened to her will deter you from taking anything ever” ) was anguished but familiar, conforming to the convention of an ecstasy-tragedy narrative established by Leah Betts’s parents more than 20 years ago. “And I can understand them being confused and upset, and in terrible, terrible pain, and saying, ‘This has got to stop,’” Lakeman goes on gently. “But you’re not going to stop it by telling your kids not to do it. If that was possible, my boys would be alive now – and so would dozens and dozens and dozens of other people.”

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Vandalism or art? Graffiti artists' deaths reignite debate

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The three young men killed in London were part of a flourishing subculture vying for a ‘king spot’

On the side of a railway bridge over Barrington Road in Brixton, south London, are the last three tags painted by Harrison Scott-Hood, 23, Alberto Fresneda Carrasco, 19, and Jack Gilbert, 23 – “Lover”, “Trip” and “‘Kbag”. They are likely to stay there for some time, as a poignant memorial to the three young men whose bodies were found 350 yards down the track on Monday morning. All three had been hit by a train.

All week, graffiti artists – or “writers”, in the language of the subculture – from around the world having been paying tribute to the three men. An Instagram page has been collating pictures of their graffiti, as well as artistic tributes. At Loughborough Junction station – the stop closest to where the three died – graffiti writers were among the mourners who have contributed to a shrine, with spray cans nestled among bouquets, and messages sprayed on the wall.

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Brick by brick, Glasgow must recreate its lost masterpiece | Ian Jack

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To rebuild Mackintosh’s great work would be a long and costly project. But the School of Art has a place in the city’s heart

It has been said that a certain class of person can spend their entire life inside the same kind of institutional architecture, never leaving the mellow English stone of the 17th century in their inevitable progress from boarding school to Oxbridge college to an inn of court. But most of us make a less splendid and more various journey. My primary school dated from 1912, my secondary school from 1934, and my tertiary place of education from 1931.

The first of these was the most attractive: “blocky red sandstone art nouveau”, says the Fife volume of the Buildings of Scotland series. Nothing much can be said for the other two, though it was from a classroom on the top floor of the third, the Scottish College of Commerce, that I first noticed the structure that has since become one of the most famous buildings in Scotland – perhaps, since its destruction, the most famous of all.

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From Killing Eve to The Good Fight, I love to see a woman win | Bim Adewunmi

News Round-up -

The news cycle has left me desperate for a happy ending

For whatever reason, I have been consuming a lot of women’s stories recently. Poetry, theatre, film, TV, the visual arts – it doesn’t matter what the medium is, I just want to climb in and stay there.

Finding the sweet spot in a woman’s life, when something vital is suddenly unlocked and she steps more fully into herself, is a treat for me. A very simple person might argue that my lust for such stories is directly traceable to the state of the world. When everything feels on fire, why not seek out the not-so-gentle serenity of an episode of Killing Eve? I see Villanelle’s (Jodie Comer) eyes glinting wildly when she is cornered in Killing Eve, and say out loud, “Oh no – she can’t die!” Sometimes, you just want to see a woman win, even a fictional unhinged assassin. (Luke Jennings’ Villanelle books are adapted by Phoebe Waller-Bridge.) It’s not soothing, exactly; it just gives me a rush. That’s how badly bruised the news cycle has left me.

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Seth Rogen Reveals the Time He Dissed Paul Ryan in Front of His Kids

News Round-up -

Scott Kowalchyk/CBS

Earlier this month, Mitt Romney hosted his annual summit in Park City, Utah, for “top Republicans, wealthy donors and powerful business leaders.”

And Seth Rogen.

Yes, the director/star of The Interview and executive producer of AMC’s Preacher was personally invited to speak at the VIP conference about Alzheimer’s—since Rogen and his wife Lauren run Hilarity for Charity, an organization that spreads Alzheimer’s awareness, funds Alzheimer’s research and provides nursing care to families affected by Alzheimer’s.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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Just election in Turkey not possible, says imprisoned Kurdish candidate

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From prison cell in Edirne, Selahattin Demirtaş urges citizens to vote against one-man rule by Erdoğan

Dressed in a suit and burgundy tie, Selahattin Demirtaş addressed his supporters through Turkey’s state-run TV. He urged citizens to vote against one-man rule by Recep Tayyip Erdoğan and his ruling party, the AKP, whom he described as bullies.

But there was one difference between all the other presidential candidates and Demirtaş, once dubbed the Kurdish Obama and leader of a persecuted leftwing party focused on Kurdish and minority rights.

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Bill Maher Gets Embarrassed By NRATV Host on ‘Real Time’

News Round-up -

HBO

On Friday night, Real Time host Bill Maher showed his ass.

The comedian welcomed Colion Noir, self-proclaimed “gun nut” and host of NRATV’s web series NOIR, onto his HBO program. But instead of challenging the disingenuous gun lobbyist, Maher presided over a bizarre—and ill-informed—love-in.

“I have seen your videos many times. You’re very good at what you do,” offered Maher by way of introduction. “You kind of earn your smirk. Because people like me who don’t really like guns, we don’t know much about guns…What are the misconceptions that bother you the most?”

Read more at The Daily Beast.

Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast here

Syrian barrel bomb attack on rebels jeopardises US-Russia deal

News Round-up -

A major offensive in the area close to Israel could risk drawing Washington further into the conflict

Syrian army helicopters have dropped barrel bombs on opposition areas of the country’s south-west for the first time in a year, reports said, in defiance of American demands that president Bashar al-Assad halt the assault.

Related: Bully-boy Erdoğan is a threat to Turkey – and the world | Simon Tisdall

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